Czarne Diamenty Ostatnio dodane płyty w kategorii: Czarne Diamenty https://ccd.pl/ Mon, 11 Dec 2017 15:55:44 Europe/Warsaw 14400 pl Club CD Club CD Online https://ccd.pl/images/website-logo-big.png https://ccd.pl/ 142 107 <![CDATA[Julie London - Julie Is Her Name Vol. 2]]> https://ccd.pl/julie-london-julie-is-her-name-vol-2-p191135/ <img src='https://www.ccd.pl/covery/APP7100.jpg' width='200' align='left' hspace='4' vspace='2'> <strong></strong> <hr>
She was the sultry film starlet-turned-torch singer-come-TV actress whose dusky alto captivated a generation. Julie London was "discovered" while running a department store elevator in Hollywood.

Just three years earlier the bountiful 15 year old, born Julie Peck to her parents, a song-and-dance duo of the vaudeville era, was singing on her parents' radio show. When she started working in the movies in the 1940s, she changed her name to London. During the course of a celebrated career in acting and music, she made more than 30 albums.

The sultry-voiced actress, who was once married to "Dragnet" producer-star Jack Webb, had a hit record with the 1950s single "Cry Me a River." The single debuted in 1955, sold three million copies and remained in demand into the 1960s.

Analogue Productions has brought back Julie Is Her Name Volume 2, making it an undeniable classic in every sense of the word. Remastered by Kevin Gray at Cohearent Audio, and plated and pressed on 200-gram vinyl at Quality Record Pressings, the result is a memory-stirring masterpiece.

Julie Is Her Name — Volume Two, has all the sincerity and warmth of her professional album debut, the best-selling Julie Is Her Name, from Liberty. An untested singer with uncompromising musical faith, an unknown record company, sophisticated, tastefully presented standards presented simply backed by just a bass and guitar — Julie Is Her Name faced long odds of success. Yet it soared to become a best-selling hit. Julie London rose to the Top 10 of every list of female vocalists.

And as to the cover, expect only top-notch reproduction for this Analogue Productions reissue. Originally a single LP jacket, they've upgraded to a gatefold incorporating more original photographs provided by Universal.

London appeared in nearly two dozen motion pictures during the 1940s and '50s; she was best known to TV audiences as nurse Dixie McCall on the 1970s hospital drama "Emergency!" She was hired on "Emergency!" by Webb," her then-former spouse, to co-star with her second husband, jazz musician Bobby Troup. Troup, who composed the iconic musical hit "Route 66" played a doctor on the show and it was he who helped sign Julie to the Liberty record label.

Describing her smoky vocal style, London once said, "It's only a thimbleful of a voice, and I have to use it close to a microphone. But it is a kind of over-smoked voice, and it automatically sounds intimate." A style inimitable, in our estimation....]]>
<![CDATA[Antonio Carlos Jobim - Stone Flower]]> https://ccd.pl/antonio-carlos-jobim-stone-flower-p192936/ <img src='https://www.ccd.pl/covery/CTI6002.jpg' width='200' align='left' hspace='4' vspace='2'> <strong></strong> <hr>
That the man from Ipanema still had a lot to say is proved by the present album, which presents Jobim’s creativity at the height of his maturity. Right from the very first number, where Urbie Green on the trombone 'sings' "Tereza My Love" so purely in the top register, it is clear that the late bossa with its typical rhythm is structurally far more refined than the early hot dance numbers. The melodies are woven through, as it were, with shining gold and silver threads of rhythm, and clusters of sound are light and airy. However, here and there, the musicians let their hair down, such as in the Latin classic "Brazil."

With that magician of sound Deodato as arranger and conductor, and Rudy van Gelder as recording engineer, this LP is certainly a Bossa masterpiece. There’s no more to be said!

"...Stone Flower is quite simply one of his most quietly stunning works...simply brilliant, a velvety, late-night snapshot of Jobim at his peak." -Thom Jurek, allmusic.com...]]>
<![CDATA[Ray Charles - The Genius After Hours]]> https://ccd.pl/ray-charles-the-genius-after-hours-p3938/ <img src='https://www.ccd.pl/covery/UDSACD2073.jpg' width='200' align='left' hspace='4' vspace='2'> <strong></strong> <hr>1961 Instrumental Set True to Its Name: The Sound of Charles Letting Loose in an Intimate Jazz Club
Intimate Affair Finds Legendary Pianist Pairing With Small Combos, Exploring Bluesy Sides
The Definitive Edition: Mobile Fidelity Hybrid SACD Boasts Unprecedented Sonic Clarity
Long Out-of-Print Album Restored and Renewed
There’s no doubting Ray Charles became a legend only after moving to Atlantic Records where, in the mid and late 1950s, he rung up a string of hits that redefined popular music and gave birth to R&B. Yet the label refused to shoehorn Charles into strictly sticking with vocal fare. Recognizing his jazz and blues roots, Atlantic both permitted and encouraged him to record instrumental sides with jazz combos and pursue piano-based material with which he was originally associated. Mastered from the original master tapes, and restored to a quality that hasn’t been realized since the initial pressings more than 50 years ago, Mobile Fidelity’s hybrid SACD version of The Genius After Hours takes its place as one of the most unsurpassed-sounding examples of Charles’ first love affair: jazz and blues. Opening up the veil onto these early 1960s sessions, the collector’s disc functions as a tableside-seat at a smoky jazz club where, for sheer fun and amusement, Charles gathers with a handful of cohorts and lets loose with hard-bop standards and swinging rhythms. The cavity of Charles’ instrument, acoustic signatures of the stand-up bass lines, and swish of the percussion are all presented with unfettered realism. Taken from the same three studio gatherings that yielded The Great Ray Charles, the eight tunes here feature the icon pairing with both a trio and a septet. Longtime collaborator David “Fathead” Newman plays tenor and alto sax, while trumpeter Joseph Bridgewater and bassist Oscar Pettiford also contribute memorable performances. Hall of Fame producer Quincy Jones handles the arrangements on the bigger-band tracks. Yet the star of the program remains Charles, and the carefree, charming manner in which he causes the music to move in any direction he wills. Refreshingly easygoing and naturally soulful, Charles plays in time with his mates, cozying up to the ivories whether responding to Newman’s brassy currents or reacting to the be-bop sway on “Joy Ride.” Slightly removed from the gospel trademarks of his more commercial fare, Charles burrows into the blues, engaging in back-and-forth dialog with the brushed drums on “Dawn Ray” and laying down countermelodies on arrangements in the septet setting. Close your eyes, and you’re feet away from Ray and the boys at an intimate 3 A.M. gathering in a small club in New York’s Greenwich Village!...]]>
<![CDATA[Antonio Carlos Jobim - Stone Flower]]> https://ccd.pl/antonio-carlos-jobim-stone-flower-p192936/ <img src='https://www.ccd.pl/covery/CTI6002.jpg' width='200' align='left' hspace='4' vspace='2'> <strong></strong> <hr>
That the man from Ipanema still had a lot to say is proved by the present album, which presents Jobim’s creativity at the height of his maturity. Right from the very first number, where Urbie Green on the trombone 'sings' "Tereza My Love" so purely in the top register, it is clear that the late bossa with its typical rhythm is structurally far more refined than the early hot dance numbers. The melodies are woven through, as it were, with shining gold and silver threads of rhythm, and clusters of sound are light and airy. However, here and there, the musicians let their hair down, such as in the Latin classic "Brazil."

With that magician of sound Deodato as arranger and conductor, and Rudy van Gelder as recording engineer, this LP is certainly a Bossa masterpiece. There’s no more to be said!

"...Stone Flower is quite simply one of his most quietly stunning works...simply brilliant, a velvety, late-night snapshot of Jobim at his peak." -Thom Jurek, allmusic.com...]]>
<![CDATA[Julie London - Julie Is Her Name Vol. 2]]> https://ccd.pl/julie-london-julie-is-her-name-vol-2-p191135/ <img src='https://www.ccd.pl/covery/APP7100.jpg' width='200' align='left' hspace='4' vspace='2'> <strong></strong> <hr>
She was the sultry film starlet-turned-torch singer-come-TV actress whose dusky alto captivated a generation. Julie London was "discovered" while running a department store elevator in Hollywood.

Just three years earlier the bountiful 15 year old, born Julie Peck to her parents, a song-and-dance duo of the vaudeville era, was singing on her parents' radio show. When she started working in the movies in the 1940s, she changed her name to London. During the course of a celebrated career in acting and music, she made more than 30 albums.

The sultry-voiced actress, who was once married to "Dragnet" producer-star Jack Webb, had a hit record with the 1950s single "Cry Me a River." The single debuted in 1955, sold three million copies and remained in demand into the 1960s.

Analogue Productions has brought back Julie Is Her Name Volume 2, making it an undeniable classic in every sense of the word. Remastered by Kevin Gray at Cohearent Audio, and plated and pressed on 200-gram vinyl at Quality Record Pressings, the result is a memory-stirring masterpiece.

Julie Is Her Name — Volume Two, has all the sincerity and warmth of her professional album debut, the best-selling Julie Is Her Name, from Liberty. An untested singer with uncompromising musical faith, an unknown record company, sophisticated, tastefully presented standards presented simply backed by just a bass and guitar — Julie Is Her Name faced long odds of success. Yet it soared to become a best-selling hit. Julie London rose to the Top 10 of every list of female vocalists.

And as to the cover, expect only top-notch reproduction for this Analogue Productions reissue. Originally a single LP jacket, they've upgraded to a gatefold incorporating more original photographs provided by Universal.

London appeared in nearly two dozen motion pictures during the 1940s and '50s; she was best known to TV audiences as nurse Dixie McCall on the 1970s hospital drama "Emergency!" She was hired on "Emergency!" by Webb," her then-former spouse, to co-star with her second husband, jazz musician Bobby Troup. Troup, who composed the iconic musical hit "Route 66" played a doctor on the show and it was he who helped sign Julie to the Liberty record label.

Describing her smoky vocal style, London once said, "It's only a thimbleful of a voice, and I have to use it close to a microphone. But it is a kind of over-smoked voice, and it automatically sounds intimate." A style inimitable, in our estimation....]]>
<![CDATA[Ray Charles - The Genius After Hours]]> https://ccd.pl/ray-charles-the-genius-after-hours-p3938/ <img src='https://www.ccd.pl/covery/UDSACD2073.jpg' width='200' align='left' hspace='4' vspace='2'> <strong></strong> <hr>1961 Instrumental Set True to Its Name: The Sound of Charles Letting Loose in an Intimate Jazz Club
Intimate Affair Finds Legendary Pianist Pairing With Small Combos, Exploring Bluesy Sides
The Definitive Edition: Mobile Fidelity Hybrid SACD Boasts Unprecedented Sonic Clarity
Long Out-of-Print Album Restored and Renewed
There’s no doubting Ray Charles became a legend only after moving to Atlantic Records where, in the mid and late 1950s, he rung up a string of hits that redefined popular music and gave birth to R&B. Yet the label refused to shoehorn Charles into strictly sticking with vocal fare. Recognizing his jazz and blues roots, Atlantic both permitted and encouraged him to record instrumental sides with jazz combos and pursue piano-based material with which he was originally associated. Mastered from the original master tapes, and restored to a quality that hasn’t been realized since the initial pressings more than 50 years ago, Mobile Fidelity’s hybrid SACD version of The Genius After Hours takes its place as one of the most unsurpassed-sounding examples of Charles’ first love affair: jazz and blues. Opening up the veil onto these early 1960s sessions, the collector’s disc functions as a tableside-seat at a smoky jazz club where, for sheer fun and amusement, Charles gathers with a handful of cohorts and lets loose with hard-bop standards and swinging rhythms. The cavity of Charles’ instrument, acoustic signatures of the stand-up bass lines, and swish of the percussion are all presented with unfettered realism. Taken from the same three studio gatherings that yielded The Great Ray Charles, the eight tunes here feature the icon pairing with both a trio and a septet. Longtime collaborator David “Fathead” Newman plays tenor and alto sax, while trumpeter Joseph Bridgewater and bassist Oscar Pettiford also contribute memorable performances. Hall of Fame producer Quincy Jones handles the arrangements on the bigger-band tracks. Yet the star of the program remains Charles, and the carefree, charming manner in which he causes the music to move in any direction he wills. Refreshingly easygoing and naturally soulful, Charles plays in time with his mates, cozying up to the ivories whether responding to Newman’s brassy currents or reacting to the be-bop sway on “Joy Ride.” Slightly removed from the gospel trademarks of his more commercial fare, Charles burrows into the blues, engaging in back-and-forth dialog with the brushed drums on “Dawn Ray” and laying down countermelodies on arrangements in the septet setting. Close your eyes, and you’re feet away from Ray and the boys at an intimate 3 A.M. gathering in a small club in New York’s Greenwich Village!...]]>